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EAB update 2014

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Once again, Emerald Ash Borer is on the move.  The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) confirmed an emerald ash borer (EAB) infestation in Olmsted County near the interchange of I-90 and U.S. Highway 63. The infested trees are about 45 miles away from the nearest EAB find in Winona County.

Because of this find, Olmsted County will join Hennepin, Houston, Ramsey and Winona counties in a state and federal quarantine. The quarantine is in place to help prevent EAB from spreading outside a known infested area into new areas.

Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer

MDA Entomologist Mark Abrahamson said that while EAB can move on its own, they suspect this new infestation was caused inadvertently though human assistance.  “This is why it’s so critical that people be aware of and follow the quarantine. He said the risk is greatly reduced if people stop moving firewood and other ash materials.” With a billion ash trees, Minnesota is highly susceptible to the destruction caused by EAB.

EAB damage under bark

EAB damage under bark

Emerald ash borer larvae kill ash trees by tunneling into the wood and feeding on the tree’s nutrients. Since its accidental introduction into North America, EAB has killed tens of millions of ash trees in 24 states.  The metallic-green adult emerald ash borer beetles are a half-inch long, and are active from May to September. Infestation signs include one-eighth inch, D-shaped exit holes in ash tree bark and winding tunnels under the bark.

EAB larvae

EAB larvae

 

EAB tree die back

EAB tree die back

Emerald Ash Borer Minnesota Department of Agriculture

The Arrest the Pest Hotline is available for a wide variety of questions related to emerald ash borer. Contact us at 1-888-545-6684 (voicemail) or arrest.the.pest@state.mn.us.

Emerald Ash Borer Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

 

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