Getting the jump on creeping weeds

Thu. May. 12, 2016

Click below to listen to my Garden Bite radio show:  Getting the jump on creeping weeds

Let’s take a look at a few creeping weeds we could do without, shall we?!

Buckthorn is the bane of landowners.  Just because a plant is great in Europe, does not mean it’s great for the U.S.  It’s invasive here!

Buckthorn bark
Buckthorn bark

Buckthorn is leafing out right now and can be easily spotted by its silvery-gray park with white lenticels, bright green, rounded young leaves and the sharp thorn on the ends of branches.  Click on the Buckthorn link for information on getting rid of it!

Garlic Mustard sounds good on a brat but not in your landscape.  It is also listed as a noxious weed.  This biennial is stealthy.  Its  cute, tidy rosette of scalloped leaves can be mistaken for a hollyhock.  Beginning gardeners or gardeners new to the area may be afraid to remove it.  An easy identifying feature: garlic-scented leaves. (Plan to throw away your gloves after pulling these plants).  Here’s the deal, this one you’ll want chemical help to eradicate.

Garlic Mustard
Garlic Mustard

Here’s another take on Garlic Mustard from Edible Wild Food.

Creeping bellflower has a European cousin – and it’s not the one we want to visit.

Campanula Rapunculoides aka Creeping Bellflower
Campanula Rapunculoides aka Creeping Bellflower

Campanula rapunculoides is an aggressive plant that doesn’t want to leave once it’s found a footing. Creeping bellflower forms mats of thick, tuber-like rhizomatous roots. It is a prolific seeder and quickly outcompetes more desirable plants for moisture and nutrients. This plant leafs out early, making it easy to spot treat with a broadleaf herbicide and easier to remove by hand while desirable plants are still emerging.

 

 

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