Best planting practices for trees and shrubs


Fri. Apr. 3, 2020

Click below to listen to my 2 min. Garden Bite radio show: Best planting practices for trees and shrubs

We used to tell you to plant trees and shrubs at the same level they came in in their container. The great part about horticulture is that we are continually learning!!  NOW, the best advice is to take a look at those plants.  Turns out that some of those plants come with too much soil on top of their graft of trunk flare.

So, what does that mean?  It means you  … [Continue reading]

Rain gardens


Thu. Apr. 2, 2020

Click below to listen to my 2 min. Garden Bite radio show: Rain gardens

Last year I was supposed to get a rain garden installed by the City as they redid my streets… however, they pushed out to this year. Alas, I wait. BUT the great thing is they WILL being doing it and that means that other cities do too! If YOUR street will be redone, be sure to ask your city streets department if they have an option for you to get one installed too.  I’ll share pictures  … [Continue reading]

April Fools Day and garden myth busting


Wed. Apr. 1, 2020

Click below to listen to my 2 min. Garden Bite radio show: April Fools Day and garden myth busting

Pulling tall tales out of the myth bucket!

Wound dressing is one of the top myths. We used to think that trees, like humans, needed some sort of “bandaid” after they’ve been cut.

Not so, in fact, there are times that those wound dressings may even inhibit the plant’s ability to heal itself. Tars, emulsions and waxes can dry and crack.

If water gets behind the crack, it can promote disease  … [Continue reading]

Hydroponic growing and why those tomatoes are kinda bland!


Tue. Mar. 31, 2020

Click below to listen to my 2 min. Garden Bite radio show: Hydroponic growing and why those tomatoes are kinda bland!

Last week I was doing a radio interview and the question came up as to why hydroponically grown tomatoes taste so bland. Honestly, I wasn’t sure.

I had to do a little digging and found a couple of possible explanations, though these are not science based but rather, hypotheses.

First, Hydroponic environments are often warm and humid, just the kind of conditions tomatoes like. They produce lots of big,  … [Continue reading]

The Victory Garden in a strange new land


Mon. Mar. 30, 2020

Click below to listen to my 2 min. Garden Bite radio show: The Victory Garden in a strange new land

As we deal with a global pandemic, gardening is the one thing we can still do to maintain sanity and safe distancing. As I said last week, the garden is my peace and I hope it brings you the same.

 

There’s been a resurgence of folks asking about Victory Gardens. 

Early in World War II, before the US stepped in with our military, the United States government appealed to  … [Continue reading]

Lawn spots – Fido, Fifi or snow mold


Fri. Mar. 27, 2020

Click below to listen to my 2 min. Garden Bite radio show: Lawn spots – Fido, Fifi or snow mold

We love our dogs but not so much what they do to our lawns over the winter.  Fido or Fifi (or Gigi)  may have left some dead spots around the yard.

Urine and your lawn don’t get along. You can buy a lawn repair kit at most garden centers or you can mix your own. The best grass seed is a mix of Kentucky blue grass with fine fescues and  … [Continue reading]

What’s there to crow about?


Thu. Mar. 26, 2020

Click below to listen to my 2 min. Garden Bite radio show: What’s there to crow about?

Crows, many folks find these birds annoying, yakking it up, lauding their territory, while others find a symbolism to the bird.  That symbolism varies greatly throughout the world.  But in practical terms, crows are pretty impressive birds.

The oldest wild crow known was 16, a crow in captivity lived to 59!  Crows collaborate in extended family groups to rear their young, some are 5 generations.  They have 250 unique calls to communicate among  … [Continue reading]

Soil structure and damage


Wed. Mar. 25, 2020

Click below to listen to my 2 min. Garden Bite radio show: Soil structure and damage

While not a sexy subject… soil structure and drainage is a big deal!

 If you peruse descriptions of a particular plants needs, they almost all say, prefers “well-drained soil”.  What is that? It’s soil that contains enough pores, the gaps between soil particles, to allow air and water to flow freely.  Ideally, the sand, silt and clay particles are arranged so they occupy only half of the space, leaving the other half as pore  … [Continue reading]

Tiptoe into Spring garden clean-up


Tue. Mar. 24, 2020

Click below to listen to my 2 min. Garden Bite radio show: Tiptoe into Spring garden clean-up

As we tiptoe into Spring, we’re gingerly getting into our gardens, cutting back the leftovers from winter.   I do say tip toe for a couple of reasons…  soggy, muddy soil, which compacts!

 Step lightly and start pruning.  I cut back my ornamental grasses to about 3 inches from the ground. You can compost those grasses or save them as mulch in your vegetable garden.

If you had issues with fungal disease on any  … [Continue reading]

Garden magic


Mon. Mar. 23, 2020

Click below to listen to my 2 min. Garden Bite radio show: Garden magic

 I struggled with how to start this Garden Bite in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. But all I kept thinking about was how much beauty we have in nature, the joy in getting our hands in the soil, seeding our gardens.

Gardens feed our bodies but, for me, they also deeply feed my soul.

 

And so, now more than ever, the magic of our gardens can lift our Spirits.

Whether our climate allows us to  … [Continue reading]